Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Participants Lead Nation in Water Savings Pilot Program June 9, 2015

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: June 9, 2015

News Release

Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Participants Lead Nation in Water Savings Pilot Program

Atlanta’s participant portfolio accounted for 43% of 377 million gallons in total water savings

ATLANTA – The City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Sustainability announced today that the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Water Pilot program exceeded 22 other cities in a national water conservation program. Atlanta buildings participating in the pilot accounted for 43 percent of the total 377 million gallons of water saved – the equivalent of 570 Olympic-sized swimming pools – in the first year of program.

“We are extremely proud of the ABBC participants across the city who have rallied around the goal to reduce energy and water use,” said Stephanie Stuckey Benfield, Director of the Office of Sustainability. “To account for nearly half of the total water savings is something the entire city should celebrate, and we see this achievement as a true reflection of the water conservation work being done across the community.”

The results of the program were revealed at the recent Better Buildings Summit in Washington, D.C. The Better Buildings Water Pilot was launched by the U.S. Department of Energy in 2014. Under the program, commercial buildings in 23 cities agreed to voluntarily measure and reduce their water consumption. In the City of Atlanta, 406 buildings have voluntarily committed to reduce energy and water use by 20 percent by the year 2020.

The Atlanta program is currently reporting 11 percent energy savings across a portfolio of 96 million square feet of commercial space in Downtown, Midtown and Buckhead, putting Atlanta’s program nine percentage points from reaching achieving its goal five years ahead of schedule.

All 23 cities in the national program will report and share their progress. The sectors represented – commercial, industrial and multifamily buildings – account for a significant share of the withdrawals from public water supplies. Using water more efficiently results in lower operating costs, a more reliable water supply, and improved water quality. Known as the “energy and water nexus” it takes a tremendous amount of energy to treat and transport water, so cutting water use also saves energy.

“As the Better Buildings Initiative enters its fourth year, leaders continue to showcase how saving energy saves money, creates jobs, and most importantly accelerates the nation’s competitiveness in the clean energy economy while preserving our environment for generations to come,” said U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz.

Atlanta’s data analysis partner, Southface Energy Institute, provides a data visualization tool which allows participants and stakeholders to view real time statistics about the ABBC’s portfolio performance. The tool, available at http://www.abbcdata.com/, highlights performance metrics ranging from energy savings by property type, carbon dioxide emissions reduction, and year over year water savings in gallons.

About the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge (Atlanta BBC)
The Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge is a nation-leading public/private initiative. Led locally by the City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Sustainability and managed by Central Atlanta Progress and the Atlanta Downtown Improvement District, the goal of the Atlanta BBC is to reduce energy and water consumption by at least 20 percent in participating buildings across Atlanta by 2020. For more information, please visit www.atlantabbc.com.

About the City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Sustainability 

The Mayor’s Office of Sustainability is focused on embedding sustainability best practices into Atlanta city government and across the community. For more information about Atlanta’s efforts to create a more sustainable city, please visit the Office of Sustainability’s page at http://p2catl.com. Follow the Office of Sustainability on Facebook and Twitter @ATLSustainable.

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