Commercial Buildings

Focus Area 1: Commercial Buildings Summary

f-a-1

Energy consumed in commercial buildings and industrial processes account for 45% of City of Atlanta’s total GHG emissions. Improving the efficiency of our commercial building stock, and reducing the energy intensity of the local industrial sector will significantly contribute to achieving City of Atlanta’s greenhouse gas reduction target. This chapter focuses on opportunities to retrofit existing commercial and industrial buildings and to ensure that future activities in these sectors are compatible with our community’s climate protection goals.

Objectives Reduction Potential
Reduce Energy Consumption by 20% in 2020 using 2009 Baseline high-impact
Strategies Actions Supports Adaptation Community/Government Reduction Potential
CB 1-Benchmark/Disclose and Retrofit existing commercial and industrial buildings A. BM

B. RCx

C. EA,

D. Subsidies

E. Others

Y Both high-impact
CB 2-Ensure new commercial and industrial construction is built to maximize energy efficiency A. Code Compliance

B. LEED compliance

Y Both medium-impact

CB 1-Benchmark/Disclose and Retrofit existing commercial and industrial buildings

high-impact
Benchmark/Disclose and Retrofit existing commercial and industrial buildings larger than 25,000 sqft to achieve a 20% reduction in energy and water use by 2020
CB1-BM Require Benchmarking and Disclosure of energy use in commercial and industrial buildings exceeding 25,000 gross square feet (10,000 gross square feet for City owned facilities) by 2020 Stage
Benchmark means to input and submit the total energy and water consumed for a property located within the City of Atlanta, as well as other descriptive information for such property as required by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, or any additional information required by tools adopted by the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability. early
According to the Institute for Market Transformation, benchmarking is the first step towards boosting building energy efficiency. According to the Institute, benchmarking can cut costs because by just knowing how much energy a building consumes, managers can begin to reduce energy consumption and save money.

Benchmarking and transparency data analysis can provide information to city officials to learn about their city’s buildings. Based on this information, city officials can be more strategic when setting their priorities and allocating resources, and they can make better, faster progress toward citywide sustainability goals.

Benchmarking also support local economies because building owners may decide to upgrade their buildings, creating jobs for contractors, engineers, and other building professionals.

CB1-RXc Retro-commissioning 50% of the existing buildings exceeding 25,000 gross square feet by 2020 Stage
Retro-commissioning means a systematic process for optimizing the energy efficiency of existing base building systems through the identification and correction of deficiencies in such systems, including but not limited to repairs of defects, cleaning, adjustments of valves, sensors, controls or programmed settings, and/or changes in operational practices. early
Retro-commissioning professional means an individual authorized to certify retro-commissioning reports.

A retro-commissioning report means a document which includes (but not limited to):

(a) Summary retro-commissioning report;

(b) Benchmarking output;

(c) Testing protocol, including a list of all equipment types tested, a list of the sample rates (percent of each type of equipment tested) for each equipment type tested, the testing methodology, including any diagnostic equipment used, and the test results, and a list of integrated system testing performed; and

(d) Master list of findings, including for each, the name of the retro- commissioning measure, a brief description of the measure, recommended corrections, the benefits attained, estimated annual savings (energy and cost), the estimated implementation cost, the net present value, and the simple payback.

CB1-EA Require Energy Audits for buildings exceeding 25,000 gross square feet by 2020 Stage
Energy Audit or audit means a systematic process of identifying and developing modifications and improvements of the base building systems, including but not limited to alterations of such systems and the installation of new equipment, insulation or other generally recognized energy efficiency technologies to optimize energy use performance of the building and achieve energy savings, provided that such process shall be at least as stringent as or comparable to the Level II Energy Survey and Engineering Analysis of the most recent edition of Procedures for Commercial Building Energy Audits published by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-conditioning Engineers Inc. (ASHRAE). early
Energy auditor means an individual possessing such certifications as determined by the Department to perform or directly supervise individuals performing energy audits and to certify audit reports. Until such time as there is a US Department of Energy (DOE)-recognized standard establishing qualifications for persons performing energy audits and such standard has been adopted by the Office of Sustainability, an energy auditor and any member(s) of the team that such auditor supervises shall have the certifications or qualifications as the Office of Sustainability deems to be appropriate.
CB1-Financing Rebates/Tax credits or lans/ Subsidies, On-bill financing Stage
Rebates/ tax credits/low or no interest loans/ subsidized capital to kick-start early energy efficient efforts – early
Utilize an Energy Services Company (ESCO): ESCOs conduct a comprehensive energy audit for a facility and identifies improvements to save energy. In consultation with the Owner, the ESCO designs and constructs a project that meets Owner’s needs and arranges the necessary funding. The ESCO guarantees that improvements will generate energy/utility cost savings sufficient to pay for the project over the term of the contract. moderate
The Property Assessment Clean Energy (PACE) is a municipal program funded via issuance of public bonds or private lenders. The bonds are secured by a property lien and repaid via special property taxes (also known as Environmental Upgrade Agreements (EUA)) moderate
CB1-Others Other Strategies Stage
Cool Roofs: According to the EPA, cool roofs reduce energy use by transferring less heat to the building below, so the building stays cooler and uses less energy for air conditioning. Cool roofs reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions by lowering energy use, and they improve human health and comfort by reducing air temperatures inside buildings with and without air conditioning, helping to prevent heat-related illnesses and deaths. early
Sub-metering: According to the National Science and Technology Council Committee on Technology, sub-metering of buildings enables the improved performance of new and existing buildings. Sub-metering provides the operations and maintenance transparency necessary to enable more efficient management of energy. In addition, sub-metering can drive behavioral change related to energy conservation. moderate
Expand Voluntary Programs: The Atlanta Better Building Challenge (ABBC) is the major voluntary program in which building owners and managers, with the support of government and nonprofit organizations, pledge to save 20% of water and energy by 2020. This program has been extremely successful in Atlanta and should be expanded. moderate
Municipal BM/AU/RCx: The City of Atlanta is leading by example to reduce energy consumption and emissions through many initiatives such as submitting buildings to participate in the ABBC and the Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative (ACBI) designed for small buildings (< 50,000 sqft). The City committed all of its fire stations and recreational centers to the project. moderate

CB 2-Ensure new commercial and industrial construction is built to maximize energy efficiency

high-impact
Ensure new commercial and industrial construction is built to maximize energy efficiency and include energy efficiency measures available, such as sub-metering
CB2-Code Compliance Enhance building code enforcement and compliance (i.e., sub-metering) in new commercial buildings to achieve 100% compliance by 2020 Stage
According to the National Science and Technology Council Committee on Technology, sub-metering enables the improved performance of new buildings. Sub-metering provides the operations and maintenance transparency necessary to enable more efficient management of energy. In addition, sub-metering can drive behavioral change related to energy conservation. early
CB2- LEED Compliance Require new municipal buildings to meet LEED Silver requirements Stage
Ordinance #03-0-1693, adopted in December 2003, requires all city-funded projects over 5,000 square feet, or over $2 million, to meet a LEED Silver rating level or higher. Projects exempt from this policy are required to complete a LEED checklist to assess any sustainable design techniques. moderate

Questions? e-mail Jairo H Garcia, Sustainability Management Analyst at jhgarcia@AtlantaGa.Gov